THE JOURNEY

Mid-August in Alabama is about as hot as hell’s back kitchen, or at least that’s what folks like to say. It was just me and ma making do as best we could since my pa got himself killed in some place called Vietnam. I don’t recall much about the day we got the news. Couple of soldiers in fancy uniforms came to the door and mama started wailing like she was being skinned alive. Ma never really got over that. Some folks said she went plum crazy that day. She’d sit on the porch in that rickety old rocking chair staring straight ahead, just mumbling to herself and fidgeting with pa’s dog tags like they was rosary beads.

I sorta became invisible to ma so I started spending my time down by the watering hole mostly swimming and fishing so we’d have something to eat. I went hunting one day, surprising ma with a rabbit and we cooked it up for dinner. Ma hugged me tight and put pa’s dog tags around my neck. Next morning I found her hanging in the barn and started screaming till the neighbors came running. That’s when I began living with the Jenkins Family. I was six years old. 

The Jenkins’ was good hard-working farm folk and they treated me real fine. They had a truckload of kids – eight boys and one girl – but they didn’t think twice about taking me in. Ma Jenkins always said “Kids fill the house with love. What’s one more mouth to feed?”

At first the days moved slow as molasses in February. I knew right quick that farming wasn’t for me but I did my share every day. When I was about fifteen or so Ma Jenkins said I sprouted into a handsome devil, the spitting image of my pa. Right about the same time I started taking up with Nell Jenkins. Two years older than me, she was all legs, boobs and big sky blue eyes. We made love every night and she taught me stuff I didn’t think was possible. Somehow we never got caught. We was crazy for each other but I wasn’t looking to get hitched. I knew if I didn’t get off that Alabama farm I’d die there. One night while Nell slept I placed my pa’s dog tags on her pillow and slipped out. I was 17 years old.  

I lied about my age and got me a job as a long distance trucker; hard as it was, it beat the hell outta farming. Shit! Where have the years gone? I been trucking now for 16 years. I’m only 33 years old and dog tired; I feel like I’m 103. I been thinking a lot about Alabama lately – maybe settling down, getting a job in a hardware store. A few days later I quit my job and went back to where it all began.

There was a nip in the air when I arrived home on the morning of Christmas Eve. It felt like snow could be coming. The Christmas tree was up in the town square, the same weathered ornaments I remembered from my teenage years. I got out of my pickup and looked around a bit; not much had changed. A brisk wind blew in from nowhere; I rubbed my hands together and stuffed them in my pockets to stay warm. A white Christmas hereabouts was almost unheard of.

Wiley’s Diner was still there. I went in and sat at the counter. It was early and the place was deserted. The cook popped his head out from the kitchen and asked what I’d like. “Coffee, please” I said and stared out the window as the first snowflakes started drifting in and I got lost in Alabama memories.

“Here ya go, fresh hot coffee. How about a slice of buttermilk pie with that?” I turned to see a young waitress wearing a Santa hat, a welcoming smile on her face. She was a pretty little thing and I found myself staring into big sky blue eyes. My heart skipped a beat. She wore a name tag with ‘Stevie’ written on it; around her neck hung dog tags and I knew. Lord Jesus! This is my baby girl! I asked if her ma’s name was Nell and she smiled, saying “Yes. Do you know her?” I said I did a long time ago. I don’t know what possessed me but I scribbled my name and number on a napkin, asking her to kindly give it to her ma. She said she surely would and tucked it in her pocket.  Choking up a bit, I lowered my head and busied myself with my breakfast. I couldn’t chance her seeing the tears in my eyes.

I tapped the brim of my cap and smiled, saying “See ya” to the girl wearing my pa’s dog tags around her neck. “Now don’t forget about giving my note to your mama”.

“No sir, I surely won’t” she replied with a smile and patted the pocket of her waitress uniform.

I walked back to my truck and sat for a long time in the cab, my face in my hands. Dear God, is this some sort of Christmas miracle? Did you bring me back here to find my daughter? After so many years and thousands of miles I wondered if Nell could ever forgive me.

NAR © 2019

16 thoughts on “THE JOURNEY”

    1. It’s comments like this that make me happy I’m a writer, to be able to tell a story that someone can read and at the end say ” Wow! That was a great story!” You made my day with that wonderful comment, Joni. I will try to make your day every time I write a new story. Thank you so much for your powerful words. I truly appreciate them! 💫 ❤️

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    1. It’s my pleasure to share with you these stories I write, KK. Knowing someone thousands of miles away is reading something I wrote and enjoying it is amazing. Thank you so much for taking the time to read my stories and leave a comment. I truly appreciate it! 💫

      Liked by 1 person

  1. (*with no particular order)
    Forest Gump, sweet home Alabama, the scene at the tree over Jenny’s grave, wow Nancy, reality is far more crazier and magical than fiction, second chance who does not deserve one, looking at the temperature at NY…feels like -9°F…🥶, here I am sitting at a 60°F sunshine, weather has gone fubar, we got love though…right?, and as a dear, dear friend says:”And in the end the love you take is equal to the love you make.”

    🎄💝🌠

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Forest Gump! I hadn’t even thought of that but thanks for the comparison. I remember the night we saw that movie. I turned to Bill at the end of the film and said “This movie is going to win the Oscar”. I think we all know how that turned out. Your comment made me feel pretty damn good! Just as an aside – we’re those people who stay in our seats until the very last credit disappears from the screen.
      It is brutal here; when I woke up this morning it was 5º. Thank goodness the roads were dry and no ice! We have nowhere to go and nothing to do this Christmas and I couldn’t be happier. This is definitely ‘stay-inside-and snuggle-by-the-fire weather’.
      That’s a fab line the a little singing group; your friend has great taste! 😉 Ciao, caro!

      Liked by 1 person

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